I have loved dolls, history, and the Victorian Era since I was little and can credit my grandmother for that. As a young girl she gave me a Godey’s Fashion print for August 1870 from my great, great Aunt Flossie. I was captivated by the dresses and became hooked. I just love to research everything and anything about the Victorian Era. I also love to design Victorian dolls. I hope you enjoy my Victorian Dolls, Victorian Traditions,The Victorian Era, and Me blog.

Friday, September 18, 2009

The Victorian "Ladies" Examiner.com Interview


Well, the Victorian " Ladies" couldn't be prouder. You see, Elizabeth de Almedia's Examiner.com interview about my Linda Walsh Originals Victorian "Ladies" was posted this week.

The interview was split in two ( Part 1 on 9/14/09 and Part 2 on 9/16/09) and the article contained some of Elizabeth de Almedia's comments and a small slide show of some of the Victorian "Ladies" pictures.

If you'd like to read the interview please click on the links below:

Part 1 - http://www.examiner.com/x-18713-NY-Doll-Collecting-Examiner~y2009m9d14-Journey-through-the-eyes-of-the-faceless-Victorian-ladies-interview-with-doll-artist-Linda-Walsh

Part 2 - http://www.examiner.com/x-18713-NY-Doll-Collecting-Examiner~y2009m9d16-Journey-through-the-eyes-of-faceless-Victorian-dollsinterview-with-Linda-WalshPart-II

Elizabeth de Almeida is the NY Doll Collecting freelance writer for the Examiner.com and is a doll artist who creates OOAK handmade dolls that have been featured in Contemporary Doll Collector and who has won numerous awards. She is also the owner of Lizjul Doll Designings and has written a book entitled: Sounds Like A Doll: We Can Find Inspiration Behind The Soul of Imagination. If you'd like to read more about Elizabeth her bio is here and her About Us page is here.

The Victorian "Ladies" and I are thrilled and honored to have been asked by Elizabeth to share our thoughts and insights on doll artistry. We thank her so much for her comments and for including us in her wonderful historic costume series: Dolls back in time: dolls of historic design and Dolls back in time: dolls of historic design - part II. Thanks, again, Elizabeth.

We hope you enjoy the interview.

Monday, September 7, 2009

Some Recognition For The Victorian "Ladies" Dolls


A few weeks ago I got an email from Elizabeth de Almeida who is the NY Doll Collecting freelance writer for the Examiner.com .

Elizabeth is a doll artist who creates OOAK handmade dolls that have been featured in Contemporary Doll Collector and who has won numerous awards. She is also the owner of Lizjul Doll Designings and has written a book entitled: Sounds Like A Doll: We Can Find Inspiration Behind The Soul of Imagination. If you'd like to buy her book just click on the link image below:


If you'd like to read more about Elizabeth her bio is here and her About Us page is here.

Well, Elizabeth wanted to know if I would be willing to do an interview for her as she was writing a few articles pertaining to dolls that depict historic times, like that of the Victorian period and thought my Victorian faceless "Ladies" would fit right in.

I, of course, was flattered and happy my Victorian "Ladies" were going to be written about. So, I told Elizabeth I would be happy to do the interview.

Elizabeth has already written two wonderful articles about historic dolls that I think you will like and they are as follows:

To our delight we were mentioned in Dolls back in time: dolls of historic design - part II . Here's short except of what Elizabeth said: Doll creations costumed in the designs of historic times such as that of the 15Th and 16Th century, (the Elizabethan and Shakespearean era) and the Victorian age, have been embraced by doll artists who have a great love for a time where one’s clothing represented status, way of life, romance, royalty and ....... And doll artists of this particular genre, capture that story through their work, technique and their artistry gifts; Doll artists such as Sara Dunlup of Ladye Fayre Dolls and Puppets, Linda Walsh of Linda Walsh Originals and Paula Wagner of Victorian Designed Dolls.

Linda Walsh creates wooden Victorian dolls, standing from 12 inches to 16 inches tall. Layers of lace, cotton, handmade bouquets and baskets of flowers, lined jackets, ribbons, laced parasols that create an essence that brings the era of the design to come to the forefront of history and time. The dolls are very unique; for the dolls bare no features on their countenances. It may offer doll collectors a chance to look beyond and through their imagination.

I hope you get a chance to read Elizabeth's two articles and will let you know when my interview is posted. I am so honored to be included in Elizabeth's "Dolls back in time: dolls of historic design" articles.

How Can You Not Love This Trio Of Flappers!


The music started playing right away and before I knew it there was a trio of flappers just dancing away. They were doing the Charleston. All heel kicking, stepping, and twirling - all in unison. They were having a carefree old time and didn't look like they were going to stop anytime soon. So, I let them dance - and dance all night they did.

They say that the roaring 20's were a time of zaniness and craziness and our trio "Roxy" flapper ladies were among the zaniest and craziest.

As cousins go Roxy Ash Blonde, Roxy Black, and Roxy White were very much alike. They were only a year apart in age and were all raised together. So, their likes and dislikes were pretty much the same. They loved to dress alike, have similar hair styles albeit of different colors, and do the same things. But when it came to dancing - well that's where they differed a little.

Roxy Ash Blonde loved to do everything with her cousins, Roxy Black and Roxy White, but despite her best efforts was never able to master the "Charleston." She just could not get her feet to move with the same rhythm as her arms. Her time was always off. So, no matter how hard she tried it was beyond her athletic abilities. So, she'd spend her time watching her cousins dance the night away.

Unlike her cousin, Roxy Ash Blonde, who despite her best efforts was never able to master the "Charleston" steps, Roxy Black was a master at it. She could move with a rhythm all her own and was fascinating to watch. In fact, she considered herself the best dancer of the 3 cousins. She knew her cousin, Roxy As Blonde, would agree with her. Now her cousin, Roxy White, well that was a different story.

Roxy White was also a master at it. She taught herself very quickly and in no time had taught her cousin, Roxy Black, too. She had a certain style and flair to her "Charleston" and was fascinating to watch. In fact, she considered herself the best dancer of the 3 cousins. However, her cousin, Roxy Black, didn't agree and was always trying to compete with her.

Despite their competing ways the cousins always traveled together and always enjoyed themselves where ever they went. They were just a trio of happy flappers.

Designer - Linda Walsh of Linda Walsh Originals